In 32 Hours, This City Received 52 Drug Overdose Calls

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In the course of just under a day and a half, Metro Emergency Services in the city of Louisville, Kentucky, received 52 drug overdose calls.

The unprecedented drug epidemic took place between last Thursday at midnight and 8 a.m. on Friday. Drugs involved in the various overdose cases included opioids, heroin, and even alcohol.

“When we say overdoses, we usually mean heroin, but that included alcohol, prescription medications, etc.,” said Emergency Services spokesman Mitchell Burmeister.

According to Burmeister, most of the cases were related to heroin abuse, which is becoming a widespread epidemic across the nation.

Related News: Mother Helps Pregnant Daughter Buy Heroin

In January 2017 alone, there was a 33% increase in drug overdoses compared to January 2016. In total, January 2017 had 695 overdose cases from substance abuse.

In relation to the 32-hour catastrophe of overdoses, Louisville authorities believe a “bad batch” was recently introduced into drug rings.

“What generally is going on when you see this is someone has introduced a batch of fentanyl in the illicit drug supply that hasn’t been cut sufficiently,” said Van Ingram, executive director of the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy. “I’m afraid it’s a reality we’re going to see repeated far too often.”

Fentanyl, an incredibly powerful painkiller, is notorious for killing the artist known as Prince.

H/T: The Washington Post

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