Al Qaeda is plotting new hits on a particular American transportation system

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According to a report in the terroristic magazine “Inspire,” al Qaeda is plotting to target a certain transportation system in the U.S.: trains and subways.

The latest report in Issue No. 17 is headlined, “Train Derail Operations.” It is set to provide details on how to create and perpetuate rail disasters in a transportation system. The report notes that most train systems do not have the unique and extensive security procedures of major airports.

By advocating the attacking of trains and marking this system down to the terrorist group’s ever growing priority list, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security will now have to contend with an escalating risk factor at train stations and subway ports. The U.S. maintains over 100,000 miles of rail.

On Friday, a report was published by the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI) claiming al Qaeda has teased the Inspire articles with a trailer appearing on Telegram app channels operated by its fans. According to MEMRI, the trailer “highlights that derailments are simple to design using easily available materials, that such a planned attack can be hard to detect, and that the outcome can substantially damage a country’s transportation sector and the Western economy in general.”

In the trailer, only one particular system is presented: an unidentified subway. It highlights the subway cars in operation, but then demonstrates the devious possibility of adding clamping rudimentary devices onto a line, which would in turn cause a derailment. In a teasing gesture, the terroristic trailer reportedly features a quote from a U.S. Government Accountability Office report on the “vulnerability of rail lines to sabotage,” according to The Washington Times.

“Simple to design,” the promo says in English script. “Made from readily available materials. Hard to be detached. Cause great destruction to the Western economy and transportation sector.”

“America” is mentioned several times throughout the trailer.

Al Qaeda in recent months has depicted itself as making a comeback from its headquarters in Yemen, considering ISIS has usually been grabbing the headlines on the terror front. While the organization has developed new alliances in North Africa, it has also expanded its social media presence to attract followers. Their premise is to advocate ideas of more mass-casualty attacks, such as their world-changing attack on New York and the Pentagon in September of 2001.

Meanwhile, the Islamic State has advocated utilizing vehicles to mow down and kill innocent civilians. Its murderous followers have weaponized vehicles, typically large trucks, in Nice, Berlin and London, creating hundreds of deaths and injuries.

In July of 2016, the Islamic State-run media outlet (Aamaq) took credit for a man who rammed his truck into a crowd of people in Nice, France.  The attack killed 84 people and wounded 200.

In December of 2016 around Christmas time, 40-year-old Tunisian man was held responsible for attacking a Christmas market attack in Berlin, Germany. The Tunisian man killed 12 and injured dozens more when he plowed a truck into the crowded market. ISIS also claimed credit for the attack.

In March of this year, a vehicle drove along the Westminister Bridge in London near the Parliament building, “mowing down” several pedestrians who were on the bridge.

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