American imam may have influenced London bridge attacker

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According to a new reports, American imam Ahmad Musa Jibril may have influenced one of the London bridge terrorists, and his whereabouts are unknown. He fled home sometime after the attacks in London, according to the UK’s The Express. They write, “Ahmad Musa Jibril left his home in Dearborn, Michigan, so quickly he left his sandals on the deck.”

Reportedly, Jibril, who is described as a “hate preacher,” preaches a Salafist version of Islam, a highly conservative strand of the religion. He created videos in his Dearborn home, preaching from his front room. In that room, a family album featured pictures of Jibril dressed as a jihadi fighter.

According to officials who have seen the album, it includes “photos of Ahmad Jebril as a teenager dressed as a mujihid or holy warrior; photos of very young children apparently holding real firearms; ‘playing’ at holding each other hostage and aiming the weapons at each other’s heads.”

One of the Briton jihadis responsible for the London bridge attack, Pakistani-born Khuram Butt, was a follower of Jibril’s. Reportedly, Butt’s friend had informed counter-terror police that Butt was talking about a “Jihadist Britain,” but he claims the officers didn’t return his calls.

Speaking anonymously, the friend reportedly said, “He used to listen to a lot of Musa Jibril. I have heard some of this stuff and its very radical. I am surprised this stuff is still on YouTube and is easily accessible.” He also says Butt spoke of a particular attack and “like most radicals he had a justification for anything and everything and that day I realized I needed to contact the authorities.”

Jibril has almost a quarter million likes on Facebook, more than 40,000 on Twitter and 16,000 subscribers on YouTube, where his sermons remain online.

Reportedly, in 2005, Jibril was jailed in Detroit. The multiple charges against him included fraud, money-laundering and mail fraud. Jibril and his father, Musa Abdallah Jibril, 66, were convicted on 42 counts. Jibril was sentenced to 5 years and 10 months in prison; his father to 4 years and 10 months.

According to the Detroit News, at the time of their arrest, the government produced a ‘Supplemental Sentencing Memorandum’ that revealed:

Ahmad Musa Jibril was running a radical Salafi website (AlSalayfoon.com) at the time of his arrest that “contained a library of fanatically anti-American sermons by militant Islamic clerics, in English and in Arabic.”

They also found that he had sent a fax to CNN in 1996 claiming responsibility for the Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia, warning “[t]here will be a series of bombings that will follow no matter how many lives of ours are taken.”

The Express claims:

The court heard how he ran his website from the home he shared with his father and they found a collection of weapons when they battered down his door as he tried to escape from his bedroom window. During the trial, he and his father tried to bribe a juror, saying they would pay for her wedding. However, she told the court and Jibril was given a further sentence.

Jibril apparently told a judge, “I am not a terrorist.”

According to the report, Jibril, his sister and mother, who all lived in Dearborn, went into hiding following the London bridge attack.

Also following the London incident, another Dearborn resident, Lebanese American Samer ElDebek, had his home raided due to a national security concern.

There is no indication that the two men were connected.

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