Apple hit with major class action lawsuit

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After admitting to slowing down older iPhone models to keep them running longer, Apple’s controversial revelation finds them being hit with a class action lawsuit.

The U.S. technology giant revealed Wednesday the hidden algorithms designed help keep an iPhone running at optimal performance if there is an older battery inside that can’t keep up with the required power. The goal is to stop unexpected shutdowns of older iPhones so they can continue operating at the best possible standard.

Following the announcement, a class action lawsuit in California was filed by Stefan Bogdanovich and Dakota Speas against Apple. They claim Apple never requested consent from them to “slow down their iPhones,” that they “suffered interferences to their iPhone usage due to the intentional slowdowns,” and that both suffered “economic damages and other harm for which they are entitled to compensation.”

Both plaintiffs are owners of an iPhone 7 and are trying to get the case certified to represent all people in the United States who owned an Apple phone older than the iPhone 8.

Apple gave a formal detailed explanation as to why older iPhone models will start to slow down:

“Our goal is to deliver the best experience for customers, which includes overall performance and prolonging the life of their devices. Lithium-ion batteries become less capable of supplying peak current demands when in cold conditions, have a low battery charge or as they age over time, which can result in the device unexpectedly shutting down to protect its electronic components.”

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