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Below is a report that DML News gives a 4 OUT OF 4 STARS trustworthiness rating. We base this rating on the following criteria:

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As the most reliable and balanced news aggregation service on the internet, DML News offers the following information published by USATODAY.COM:

Americans should not eat any romaine lettuce amid concerns over a new E. coli outbreak, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Tuesday.

Consumers should throw away any romaine lettuce and retailers and restaurants should not sell or serve it, the CDC said.

The article goes on to state the following:

At least 32 people in 11 states have gotten sick from the same strain of E. coli in the outbreak. The illnesses started in October and have hospitalized at least 13 people, including one with a kind of kidney failure, the CDC said.

Below is a portion of the warning posted on the CDC website:

  • Consumers who have any type of romaine lettuce in their home should not eat it and should throw it away, even if some of it was eaten and no one has gotten sick.
    • This advice includes all types or uses of romaine lettuce, such as whole heads of romaine, hearts of romaine, and bags and boxes of precut lettuce and salad mixes that contain romaine, including baby romaine, spring mix, and Caesar salad.
    • If you do not know if the lettuce is romaine or whether a salad mix contains romaine, do not eat it and throw it away.
    • Wash and sanitize drawers or shelves in refrigerators where romaine was stored. Follow these five steps to clean your refrigerator.
  • Restaurants and retailers should not serve or sell any romaine lettuce, including salads and salad mixes containing romaine.
  • Take action if you have symptoms of an E. coli infection:
    • Talk to your healthcare provider.
    • Write down what you ate in the week before you started to get sick.
    • Report your illness to the health department.
    • Assist public health investigators by answering questions about your illness.

To get more information about this article, please visit USATODAY.COM. To weigh in, leave a comment below.

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