Claim: Comey makes request to Justice Dept on Trump’s wiretapping claims

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Although FBI director James Comey has made no public statement on the matter, the New York Times published a story Sunday claiming Comey has stated Trump’s allegation about Obama ordering wiretapping is false and “must be corrected.”

The NY Times reported that Comey made the request on Saturday, asking the Justice Department (DOJ) to “knock down the claim because it falsely insinuates that the FBI broke the law.”

“Senior American officials” reportedly informed the NY Times of Comey’s request, but the story does not list a source, and said that neither a spokesman for the FBI nor DOJ spokesperson Sarah Isguur Flores would comment.

The NY Times said Comey’s “behind the scenes maneuvering” is in stark contrast to his actions last year when he made public statements about Hillary Clinton’s email case.

Senior FBI officials are reportedly concerned that claims of wiretapping approved by the court insinuate that the feds have evidence that the Trump campaign did collude with Russia’s efforts to disrupt the election.

Former intelligence director James R. Clapper, Jr., denied that the wiretapping occurred, telling NBC’s “Meet the Press,” “There was no such wiretap activity mounted against the president-elect, at the time, as a candidate or against his campaign.”

White House spokeswoman Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Monday on ABC’s “Good Morning America” that she doesn’t believe President Trump accepts Comey’s denial of his claims that wiretapping occurred.

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