Federal Judge: Improve Conditions of Illegal Detainees Detention Centers!

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A federal judge has ordered the U.S. Border Patrol to tidy up and upgrade their facilities used to hold those who are arrested for entering America illegally.

Tuscon.com reports that a lawsuit filed back in 2015 by immigrant-rights groups, state that many illegals currently being detained for crossing the border, are subject to “inhumane and punitive conditions.”

U.S. District Court David Bury that by allowing these detainees to live without clean bedding and not enough toilets per amount of people, for example, it violates their rights. Bury cited an “expert” who inspected some facilities and found, “holding rooms with floors, walls, benches, drains, toilets, sinks, stalls and other fixtures, “all of which were badly soiled.” Bury said “some of the conditions cited by the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups representing detainees amount to a deprivation of their constitutional rights.” And that, the judge said, “constitutes irreparable injury.”

Bury ordered the US Border Patrol officials to self monitor its conditions, insuring that there are working toilets, sinks, toiletries, and the proper cell temperature. An ample supply of baby food and diapers is also necessary. The judge also stated his displeasure with other problems, like a lack of trash receptacles. It seems the detainees, who come from countries where their plumbing cannot handle toilet paper, were throwing said paper into the garbage cans.

Melissa Crow, legal director of the American Immigration Council, said Bury “properly rejected the agency’s excuses that it had done everything within its means to protect the health and safety of those in its custody.”

The agency stated they had legitimate safety concerns at the overcrowded facilities. One of the complaints was that the detention facility had to leave the lights on 24 hours a day but the agency stated that was necessary for security reasons  The agency is in the process of rectifying some of the complaints by changing blankets over to more insulated Mylar blankets, and reviewing the other fixes.

The facilities are temporary detention facilities, with the majority of detainees spending less than 72 hours there before being processed and released.







 

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