First Lady Melania Trump speaks at International Women of Courage ceremony

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The First Lady was a keynote speaker and helped present awards Wednesday at the International Women of Courage Awards ceremony at the State Department in Washington, D.C.

In the introduction of Melania Trump, it was noted that she has been a “driving force behind the administration’s efforts to promote the empowerment of women and children,” has been an honorary chairwoman for the Boys Club of New York for five consecutive years, and, in 2005, was awarded the title of Goodwill Ambassador by the American Red Cross. She helped launch National Child Abuse Prevention month in 2008 and has been a champion for the American Heart Association.

As First Lady, she has stated she wants to focus on the issues of cyberbullying among youth.

In her opening statement, Mrs. Trump said, “I’m deeply humbled to be here today to honor these 12 remarkable and inspirational women who have given so much for so many, regardless of the unimaginable threat to their own personal safety. Each one of these heroic women has an extraordinary own story of courage, which must inspire each of us to achieve more.”

She helped present awards to the 13 women being honored from around the world, including Bangladesh, Botswana, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Sri Lanka, Syria, Turkey, Vietnam, and Yemen.

Below is her complete speech.

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