Ginsburg to Students: I’m Disheartened by Anti-Immigrant Sentiment

Contributed by Michelle St. Pierre

Speaking to students at a high school in Hawaii, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Ginsburg said she was “disheartened” at the amount of anti-immigrant sentiment going across the country recently.

According to the Honolulu Civil Beat, the students were advised to not ask questions about things that might become a case in court, including the 9th Circuit Court’s t recent decision to block President Trump’s  “extreme vetting” order, but one student reportedly asked Ginsburg if she believed that immigrants benefited the country.

Ginsburg replied, “I think of the U.S. as a place that welcomes people from abroad who want to work and who are yearning to be free. It’s disheartening to see that there are some people who don’t agree with that view who think our borders should be closed. But it’s not the first time in U.S. history that has happened.” She also added that she is optimistic the US would be viewed again “as a land of freedom and democracy that embraces people who come to us as strangers and then become a part of us.”

It was not the first time that Ginsburg had made remarks critical of President Trump. During the election, Ginsburg had remarked that she “could not imagine what the country would be like” should there be a Trump administration. Later, she apologized, calling the remarks “ill-advised.”

During the same talk over the weekend, Ginsburg also touched on similar remarks she made earlier about liking to see the Electoral College come to an end. She also went on to say that would be a difficult road to take because that would require a constitutional amendment.

It has been noted that if the case with the Trump administration does reach the nation’s high court, Ginsburg’s remarks about President Trump could be used as evidence that she cannot be impartial and must recluse herself from hearing cases involving the Trump Administration.

H/T: Lawnewz.com

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