GOP congressman pulls out loaded gun to make point about weapons

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While speaking to constituents Friday, Rep. Ralph Norman (R-S.C.), used a loaded gun to make a point about gun safety.

Speaking about gun violence, Norman told reportedly pulled out his .38-caliber Smith & Wesson and set it on a table as he spoke.

Norman told The Post and Courier that he placed it on a table for several minutes in order to make the point that guns are only dangerous in the hands of criminals.

From the publication: “I’m not going to be a Gabby Giffords,” Norman said afterward, referring to the former Arizona Democratic congresswoman who was shot outside a Tucson-area grocery store during a constituent gathering in 2011.

Norman was speaking to constituents about gun violence during a public meeting at the Rock Hill Diner.

The report continues: The move, Norman said, was intended to prove “guns don’t shoot people; people shoot guns.”

Norman is a state concealed carry permit holder and said he regularly brings his gun with him when out in public.

If anyone walked into the diner and started shooting, Norman told the attendees, he would be able to protect them because of his gun.

“I don’t mind dying, but whoever shoots me better shoot well or I’m shooting back,” he told The Post and Courier.

Some attendees said they found the congressman’s display unsettling, but State Republicans supported Norman.

“Hysterical to see liberals freak out over @RalphNorman accurately demonstrating that guns really are inanimate objects,” tweeted state GOP Chairman Drew McKissick.

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