ILLEGALS FREE TO GET BENEFITS. Lawyer, Shahid Haque-Hausrath Rejoices

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The Border Crossing Law Film operates in Montanna.  “Border Crossing Law Firm” — no kidding, that’s the name of the business operated by attorney, Shahid Haque-Hausrath.

According to his website, Shahid Haque-Hausrath dedicates his practice to helping immigrants obtain legal status in the United States and pursue all that the country has to offer. Mr. Haque-Hausrath assists clients with a wide variety of immigration matters, including applications with the consulates abroad and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, representing clients arrested by the Department of Homeland Security, and defending immigrants in removal proceedings in Immigration Court.

You’d think a lawyer would know the difference between an immigrant and an illegal alien? Obviously not.  But then again, how can we expect him to do such a thing when the courts in Montanna cannot determine the difference between illegal and legal.

Shahid Haque-Hausrath had his paws in this recent case:

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The Montana Supreme Court has barred state officials from reporting the immigration status of people seeking state services, striking down the last piece of a voter-approved law meant to deter people who are in the U.S. illegally from living and working in Montana.

The court’s unanimous decision on Tuesday upholds a Helena judge’s 2014 ruling in a lawsuit that the law denying unemployment benefits, university enrollment and other services to people who arrived in the country illegally was unconstitutional.

The justices went further, rejecting the one remaining provision that required state workers to report to federal immigration officials the names of applicants who are not in the U.S. legally.

The Montana Legislature sent the anti-immigrant measure to the 2012 ballot, where it was approved by 80 percent of voters. The new law required state officials to check the immigration status of applicants for unemployment insurance benefits, crime victim services, professional or trade licenses, university enrollment and financial aid and services for the disabled, among other things.

The law required state officials to deny services to people found to be in the country illegally, and to turn over their names to immigration officials for possible deportation proceedings. The law used the term “illegal aliens,” which is not found in federal immigration laws and became the focal point of the lower and higher courts’ rulings.

The courts ruled the state was attempting to meddle in an area of federal jurisdiction using a term that is unconstitutional because it conflicts with the federal laws. The entire law is pre-empted by federal immigration laws, the Montana Supreme Court opinion said.

Plaintiffs’ attorney Shahid Haque-Hausrath said the decision sends a message that the state has no business creating its own immigrant enforcement schemes.

“The law was a discriminatory attempt to drive immigrants out of the state, and would have unjustly targeted immigrants with valid federal immigration status,” he said.

 







 

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