Intel officials dodge hitting questions about Trump probe

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During a hearing Wednesday before the Senate Intelligence Committee, several top intelligence officials are refusing to answer specific questions when it comes to their personal interactions with President Trump.

NSA head Adm. Michael Rogers stated, “In the three-plus years that I have been the director of the National Security Agency, to the best of my recollection, I have never been directed to do anything I believed to be illegal, immoral, unethical or inappropriate,” but refused to get into specifics about his conversations with Trump in a public hearing.

When acting FBI chief Andrew McCabe was asked, “Did Director Comey ever share details of his conversations with the President with you – in particular, did Director Comey ever say that the President had asked for his loyalty?”

McCabe responded, “I’m not going to comment on conversations that Comey had with the President.”

Newly confirmed National Intelligence Director Daniel Coats also refused to get into details, saying, “I don’t believe it’s appropriate for me to address conversations with President Trump in a public session.”

All four intelligence officials said the White House did not give them any instructions on how to respond to questions during the hearing, or invoke executive privilege.

Republican Senator Marco Rubio asked repeatedly if anyone at the White House had asked them to influence an ongoing investigation.  They responded, “No.”

 

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