Iranians busted for stealing weapons design software from U.S. company

The U.S. Department of Justice published a press release Monday morning, announcing the unsealing of an indictment against two Iranian nationals who are charged with hacking into a Vermont-based engineering and software design company, stealing software and remarketing it to Iran.

Mohammed Reza Rezakhah, 39 and Mohammed Saeed Ajily, 35 are both charged with criminal conspiracy relating to computer fraud, including the unauthorized access and theft of information, as well as exporting a defense article without a license, in violation of the sanctions against Iran.

In the indictment just released by the Justice Department, the violated company in Vermont was Arrow Tech, a engineering consulting and software company.

The scheme, operating under the company name “Dongle Labs,” was conducted between August 2007 to May 2013. Rezakhah, Ajily, and a third individual, Nima GoJestaneh, who has already plead guilty, conspired together to hack into the software and redistribute it in Iran, marketing and selling it to Iranian entities, including universities, military and government entities, according to the Justice Department.

Part of the software they stole was a program to design weapons.  A primary part of the stolen software included the Projectile Rocket Ordnance Design and Analysis System (PRODAS), a program Arrow Tech used to design projectiles, from bullets to GPS guided artillery shells, according to the indictment.

The Justice Department reported that “the defendants are presumed innocent unless proven guilty,” and the case was investigated by FBI’s Albany Cyber Squad.

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