Lawsuit against Trump and supporters will proceed

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When President Trump was campaigning last March as a candidate for the Republican nomination, protesters tried to disrupt his rally in Louisville, Kentucky.

The future president famously yelled, “Get ‘em out of here!”

That incident has come back to haunt him, now that a federal judge has ruled that Trump’s words “incited violence.”

Rejecting free speech as Trump’s defense, a lawsuit brought by those protesters, who claim that Trump supporters attacked them at the rally, will now proceed against Trump, his campaign, and three of his supporters.

According to the judge’s ruling: “It is plausible that Trump’s direction to ‘Get ’em out of here’ advocated the use of force. Unlike the statements at issue in the cases cited by the Trump defendants, ‘Get ’em out of here’ is stated in the imperative; it was an order, an instruction, a command.”

At the time, Trump called protesters who came to his rallies to cause trouble “bad dudes” who are “really dangerous.”

“They have done bad things, and they are really dangerous and get in there and start hitting people. And we had a couple big, strong, powerful guys doing damage to people. … It’s usually the police, the municipal government because I don’t have guards all over these stadiums. I mean, we fill up stadiums,” Trump explained last year.

Trump’s lawyer has said supporters in Kentucky were not acting on Trump’s behalf.

H/T: The Hill

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