Legendary conservative filmmaker is making a movie with real life heroes

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Clint Eastwood, known for his heroic Hollywood depictions, has cast the three California men who helped stave off a terrorist on a French train in 2015 in his latest film.

Eastwood isn’t known for his political correctness, but specializes in movies about real life heroics. Recently, he’s directed “American Sniper” and “Sully.”

Eastwood will base this film, “The 15:17 to Paris,” off the book the three childhood friends from California, Airman 1st Class Spencer Stone, Oregon National Guardsman Alek Skarlatos and civilian Anthony Sadler, wrote about their experience thwarting terrorism.

The Sacramento-area men were vacationing in Europe when they tackled Ayoub El-Khazzani, a man who authorities said has ties to radical Islam. El-Khazzani had boarded the Paris-bound train with a Kalashnikov rifle, pistol and box cutter.

Skarlatos opened up to Fox News in May about what drove him to act.

“It was just kind of a gut response. I guess I was just lucky that I was able to do something and not freeze up. That was the biggest thing I was grateful for because when you think about something like that, you never really know how you’re going to react until you actually do and so I was grateful I didn’t just sit there in shock.”

Heroes playing themselves in movies about their deeds is common when they only have a few lines, but for the three men to be the stars is unprecedented in Hollywood history.

A post shared by Alek Skarlatos (@alekskarlatos) on

 

 

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