Plans announced for the president’s Florida visit to survey Irma damage

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders announced on Tuesday that President Trump will travel to Florida later this week to survey the damage caused by Hurricane Irma.

Sanders did not offer more details about the trip, other than to say it would commence on Thursday. Where the president will travel in the state, or if First Lady Melania Trump will join him during the visit, was not disclosed.

According to reports, on Tuesday the Federal Aviation Administration posted a VIP Movement notification that covers Fort Myers, which is located on Florida’s West Coast. That type of travel advisory is typically issued before the president travels to a destination in the U.S.

On Sunday, as President Trump and Melania were arriving at the White House after a weekend at the Camp David retreat in Maryland, the president said: “We’re going to Florida very soon.”

Littered with questions from the press, the president had to shout his remarks over the noise from the waiting Marine One helicopter.

He praised the way federal agencies were handling the storm, and said of Hurricane Irma: “The bad news is that this is some big monster.”

At that time, a date had not been set for his visit.

Irma made landfall in the Florida Keys early Saturday morning as a Category 3 storm, packing 130 mph winds. More than 6-million people were ordered to evacuate from Florida’s coastal and southern areas ahead of the storm, making landfall on the mainland Sunday.

President Trump recently made two trips to Texas, touring areas damaged by Hurricane Harvey.

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