POLL: Should there be a reform on age limits to hold political office?

Late Wednesday night, it was confirmed that Sen. John McCain’s blood cot was a result from an aggressive, cancerous brain tumor. The unexpected news shocked politicians across the board, while also drawing large amounts of sympathy as well.

The revelation of McCain’s brain tumor may not be entirely surprising, considering McCain is at the ripe age of eighty. His health has shown to be in a perpetual decline following slip ups at certain hearings, and McCain’s overall impact on the healthcare repeal and replace initiative is stalled without his presence.

Condolences are in order for the veteran senator who, whether you like him or not, at one point did serve for our country. However, considering McCain’s long stay in politics, his situation not only poses the question of applying term limits, but also of possibly reforming or amending law based on age limits.

This is not obviously to say that every older individual is incapable of holding a political office for the country. Take President Trump for example, who turned 71 last May and is operating the U.S. swiftly without any medical mishaps.

Typically though, most on the older spectrum have trouble maintaining their responsibilities due to aging. Currently, the youngest you can run for president is thirty-five, with the notion being that anyone younger than this number holding the title of POTUS would not be wise or well-versed enough to run the country properly.

Should their be age limit reform across the political board in the U.S.? Possibly a cap, or an overall reshaping of the rules?

Vote and share your thoughts on the matter:

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