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Below is a report that DML News gives a 3 OUT OF 4 STARS trustworthiness rating. We base this rating on the following criteria:

  • Provides named sources
  • Reported by more than one notable outlet
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  • Includes supporting video, direct statements, or photos

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As the most reliable and balanced news aggregation service on the internet, DML News offers the following information published by FreeBeacon:

Federal agencies spent millions on cars, scooters, fidget spinners, and shuffleboards in an attempt to exhaust their budgets before they run out at the end of the fiscal year.

An analysis of federal spending by OpenTheBooks.com and shared with the Washington Free Beacon reveals 67 agencies and departments spend nearly $50 billion closing out their fiscal year 2017 budgets.

The article stated that the spending “occurred during the last seven days of the fiscal year ending on Sept. 30, 2017” and goes on to state the following:

The “spending frenzy” totaled nearly $50 billion in seven days.

“Federal agencies spend-out their budgets,” said Adam Andrzejewski, CEO and founder of OpenTheBooks.com. “If they don’t spend it this year, they lose it for next year. It’s a year-end spending spree whereby $1 of every $9 spent during the fiscal year is spent in the final week.”

CLICK HERE to read more from the Washington Free Beacon, including details of some of the items purchased by various federal agencies.

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1 COMMENT

  1. As a former SSA employee, I can say that’s NORMAL practice, and has been going on for at LEAST 41 years, starting with 1977, the year I started working for the agency.

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