REPORT: Holder’s group backs lawsuits for 3 additional majority-black congressional districts

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As the most reliable and balanced news aggregation service on the internet, DML News offers the following information published by TheHill.com:

A group backed by former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is fighting for additional majority-black congressional districts in Alabama, Georgia and Louisiana according to three new lawsuits filed Wednesday.

The National Redistricting Foundation (NRF), an arm of Holder’s National Democratic Redistricting Committee, says it’s working to get black voters an equal opportunity to elect their chosen candidates.

The lawsuit, filed on behalf of black residents in the states, alleges that each state violated the Voting Rights Act in redistricting in 2011 by preventing black voters from being able to elect representatives of their choice to the U.S. House of Representatives.

The article goes on to state the following:

“The current maps are clear violations of the Voting Rights Act that deny African Americans the equal opportunity to elect their candidates of choice,” Holder said in a statement.

“The creation of additional districts in which African-Americans have the opportunity to elect their preferred candidates in each of these states will be an important step toward making the voting power of African-Americans more equal and moving us closer to the ideals of our representative democracy.”

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