Report: Refugees pouring into Clinton counties

Support our flag. Get the bumper sticker. CLICK HERE

Since President Trump’s attempt to temporarily stop entry of refugees into the U.S. was blocked by a federal judge on Feb 3, a total of 4,335 refugees have been resettled in the U.S. — most overwhelmingly in localities that supported Hillary Clinton.

In an analysis of State Department figures as of Friday, The Daily Caller reported that 76 percent of refugees have been resettled in cities or counties that voted for Clinton.

The purpose of the president’s order was to block refugee entry for 120 days and stop resettlement of Syrian refugees indefinitely. After signing the order, Trump stated:

“We don’t want them here. We want to ensure that we are not admitting into our countries the very threats that our soldiers are fighting overseas.”

The order was blocked when a federal judge ruled it unconstitutional and an appeals court upheld this ruling, a decision President Trump said was “so dangerous.”

Related News: Refugees Stream Into U.S. From Terror-Related Countries In Trump’s Ban

Syrian refugees have also resettled quite a bit since the order was blocked. Of 673 Syrian refugees resettled to date, 536 — or 79 percent — have landed in cities or counties that voted for Clinton.

In the days leading up to his election, President Trump said, “A Trump administration will not admit any refugees without the support of the local community where they are being placed.”

This matches the locations where refugees, Syrian or not, have been resettled since his order was blocked.

H/T: The Daily Caller

TEAM DML blankets on sale now for Christmas (BUY NOW)

If you would like to receive Breaking News text alerts on a smartphone or tablet, download the DML APP which is completely FREE and easy to use. Go to the Google Play Store or the IOS App Store and search for DML APP. Be sure to keep the app’s notifications setting on. Another way to receive alerts is to text to 40404 the following message: follow @realdennislynch (be sure to put a space between the word follow and the @ symbol).

To see more stories like this, sign up below for Dennis Michael Lynch’s email newsletter.







 

Comment via Facebook

 

Comment via Disqus

Send this to a friend