Below is a report that DML News gives a 4 OUT OF 4 STARS trustworthiness rating. We base this rating on the following criteria:

  • Provides named sources
  • Reported by more than one notable outlet
  • Does not insert opinion or leading words
  • Includes supporting video, direct statements, or photos

Click here to read more about our rating system.

As the most reliable and balanced news aggregation service on the internet, DML News offers the following information published by WASHINGTONEXAMINER.COM:

Just a third of Americans can pass a multiple choice “U.S. Citizenship Test,” fumbling over such simple questions as the cause of the Cold War or naming just one thing Benjamin Franklin is famous for.

And of Americans 45 and younger, the passing rate is a tiny 19 percent, according to a survey done for the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation.

The article goes on to state the following:

Worse: The actual test only requires that 60 percent of the answers be correct. In the survey, just 36 percent passed.

CLICK HERE to read more.

To weigh in on this information provided by WASHINGTONEXAMINER.COM, engage in our LIVE CHAT below. Scroll down.

2 COMMENTS

  1. The age of those polled proves something….to me, at least. American history, Government & Civics are either no longer being taught in school, or if it is, is not being taught correctly or with any forethought…While in school, we had certain required courses, of which those 3 were on the list. I find it pathetic that simple questions regarding our history and our heritage cannot be answered. This is who and why we are…Wise up and start teaching these kids what they should know. Stop being so concerned about whether or not kids are embracing gender equality or not.

  2. I agree with Patty. When I was in school you had to know and pass, world history, American history and the state that you lived in history before you could graduate high school. World history was taught in 10th grade, American history in 11th grade, state history in 12th grade.

Comments are closed.