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As the most reliable and balanced news aggregation service on the internet, DML News offers the following information published by DailyMail:

South Africa has withdrawn its white farmland redistribution bill – six days after Donald Trump warned he was closely studying the situation.

The ruling African National Congress (ANC) said the bill passed by parliament in 2016 enabling the state to make compulsory purchases of land to redress racial disparities in land ownership needed further consideration.

The article goes on to state the following:

It comes after Trump criticised the country’s land reform plans in a tweet that touched on the overwhelmingly white ownership of farmland in South Africa – one of the most sensitive issues in the country’s post-apartheid history.

‘I have asked Secretary of State… (Mike) Pompeo to closely study the South Africa land and farm seizures and expropriations and the large scale killing of farmers,’ tweeted Trump to his 54 million followers.

The Daily Mail also reported:

Trump’s tweet was quickly lambasted by many in South Africa, with one top ruling party official, Zizi Kodwa, telling the Associated Press that Trump has never experienced apartheid and doesn’t know its legacy of stark inequality.

Later on Thursday, State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the administration’s position was that land expropriation without compensation ‘would risk sending South Africa down the wrong path.’

Nauert toned down Trump’s language suggesting that massive land seizures were underway and did not repeat the president’s suggestion that large numbers of white South African farmers had been killed.

Trump’s tweet did find support among some South Africans, while some farmers spoke out about their security concerns.

‘We try very hard not to go and live in a walled security area somewhere, but it costs a lot of money in the first place to have the necessary security,’ said Leon Sholtz, a farmer in Broederstroom in North West province.

‘It is fact that we have lost four of our neighbors in the last 10 to 12 years due to farm murders. … I think it is something that the government should look into and try and stop as soon as possible.’

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