Sessions busts dirtbag producing child pornography – gets 30 years

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his team at the DOJ are taking down one dirtbag at a time.

Each day we find ourselves here at DML reporting on the great work being done at the Department of Justice.

Some of what we report is huge, like Sessions taking down the biggest health insurance fraud ring in American history.  While other reports are smaller, like the one below about a dirtbag who was nabbed for producing child pornography.

The media is completely ignoring these stories, instead that are focused on the president’s criticism of Sessions in the Russia investigation.  The attacks on Sessions from Trump have stopped, but even so, the media continues to ignore the great work being done by Sessions.

The story below is important because it shows a dedication to stopping crimes of all kind, especially the crimes that hurt our children.  Sessions and his team have stopped a Virginia man from producing child pornography.  The guy was sentenced to 30 years in prison and a lifetime of supervised release for production of child pornography.  But make no mistake, the children he exploited will live with a lifetime of nightmares.

This isn’t the first story we’ve reported on regarding Sessions and his crackdown on pornography. Two weeks ago we reported about him nabbing a Kansas man who was sentenced to 210 months in prison and 10 years of supervised release for production of child pornography, stemming from his participation in an internet scheme that enticed minors as young as eight years old to perform sexually explicit acts on web cameras.

HERE IS THE OFFICIAL PRESS RELEASE about the Virginia man:

Virginia Man Sentenced to 360 Months for Production of Child Pornography

A Virginia man was sentenced today to 360 months in prison and a lifetime of supervised release for production of child pornography, announced Acting Assistant Attorney General Kenneth A. Blanco of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division and Acting U.S. Attorney Rick A. Mountcastle of the Western District of Virginia.LaMarcus Thomas, 33, of Winchester, Virginia, previously pleaded guilty to two counts of production of child pornography.  Chief U.S. District Judge Michael F. Urbanski presided over the sentencing.

Through the course of an investigation by the Winchester Police Department on other charges, Thomas was discovered to have multiple images and videos of child pornography, involving two different minor victims, contained in his cellular phone.  When interviewed by the FBI, Thomas admitted to producing the images and videos of child pornography.

This case was investigated by the FBI and the Winchester Police Department, and Virginia State Police aided with the forensic analysis of digital media.

The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Nancy Healey of the Western District of Virginia and Trial Attorney Leslie Williams Fisher of the Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS) of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse, launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice.  Led by U.S. Attorneys’ offices and CEOS, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.(link is external)

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