Sports Illustrated slammed for photoshoot in hurricane-ravaged Caribbean

People in the hurricane-ravaged islands of the Caribbean are out of water, food and fuel, but the bikini-clad beauties of Sports Illustrated are apparently still having fun.

Almost better-known for its swimsuit issue than the sports stories the magazine is supposed to be covering, the folks at SI decided to post sexy photos of the Brooklyn Nets cheerleaders on Tuesday, posing in bikinis in the Caribbean, despite the fact that it was slammed by Hurricane Irma last week.

The British army is currently coordinating relief efforts from Barbados, where the shoot for the team’s 2018 calendar has been taking place, according to a report in Page Six that ran on Wednesday.

Days before, the swimsuit issue team posted topless shots of a model taken by a pool in Houston, which was, of course, hit hard by Hurricane Harvey just two weeks ago.

The photo, which was originally posted by U.S. Virgin Islands native and former SI cover star Hannah Jeter, was accompanied by this desperate plea on a Twitter post from local residents: “People in the Virgin Islands are running out of fuel, water and food. People are dying!!! People are lost!!!! We are an afterthought and are not getting the help that we need!!! . . . This is an emergency!!!!!”

An SI reader called the series of shots “incredibly shameless and inappropriate given the devastation in Texas and the Caribbean.”

An SI rep, thus far, has declined to comment.

The @brooklynettes are making our debut swimwear line look REAL GOOD. 👀 #BrooklynInBarbados

A post shared by Sports Illustrated Swimsuit (@si_swimsuit) on

If you would like to receive Breaking News text alerts on a smartphone or tablet, download the DML APP which is completely FREE and easy to use. Go to the Google Play Store or the IOS App Store and search for DML APP. Be sure to keep the app’s notifications setting on. Another way to receive alerts is to text to 40404 the following message: follow @realdennislynch (be sure to put a space between the word follow and the @ symbol).

To see more stories like this, sign up below for Dennis Michael Lynch’s email newsletter.







 

Comment via Facebook

Send this to a friend