Teen rescued alive after falling 60 feet into mine shaft (video)

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It took rescuers almost four hours to pull a 15-year-old boy out of an old mine shaft Thursday afternoon, after he reportedly fell over 60 feet.

The incident happened near Golden, Colorado, where the boy and a friend were exploring the mine shaft, and a nylon rope he was using snapped, sending him plunging. His friend went for help and led rescuers back to the boy.

The boy was already down in the mine shaft about 40 feet when his rope snapped, and he fell another 60 feet from that point, so rescuers had to bring him up over 100 feet.

Since the hole did not go straight down, rescue crew members had a harder time reaching him, maneuvering their way across the uneven surface.

“It was quite an extended rescue,” said Golden Fire Chief Bob Burrell.

The teen ended up with a broken leg, and was rushed to St. Anthony’s Hospital after he was pulled from the mine.

In an interview with CBS4 Denver, the teen’s brother, Jordan, said the boy has explored there before, and the family has been worried about it.

“He’s done this numerous times and it’s been a concern of the family. It’s unsafe. We didn’t think much of it until now,” Jordan said.

The nylon rope the boy used was not appropriate for rock climbing, officials said. In fact, the boys were not equipped to do rappelling at all, according to Burrell.

“They had no climbing gear with them, they had no helmets, they were dressed in sweatshirts and sweaters. They weren’t prepared for anything,” he said.

 

 

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