Trump accuser requested job with campaign

Support our flag. Get the bumper sticker. CLICK HERE

Prior to publicly accusing President Donald Trump of sexually assaulting her in the 1990s, a New York cosmetics executive sought a job with his presidential campaign and the assistance of then-candidate Trump in pitching her line of cosmetics.

Jill Harth acknowledged that, between the summer of 2015 and early 2016, she approached Trump’s corporate assistant and sent personal emails to Trump seeking to be hired as his makeup artist and to convince Trump to represent her trademarked line of male beauty products.

In an Oct. 1, 2015, email to Trump, Harth wrote, “Hi Donald, you are doing a tremendous job of shaking things up in the United States. I am definitely on Team Trump as so many others are.”

“I can’t watch television without seeing you or hearing your name everywhere!” Harth wrote in the email, which was sent to Trump at his company’s New York headquarters. “It’s a good thing for sure but PLEASE let me do your makeup for a television interview, a debate, a photo session, anything!”

Harth assured Trump that her makeup techniques could improve his appearance on television.

“It kills me to see you looking too orange and with white circles under the eyes,” she wrote. “I will get your skin looking smoother and even toned,” she wrote, adding that she would “sculpt” Trump’s face.

In a subsequent email, Harth offered to speak publicly on behalf of Trump and his campaign, telling prospective voters how he helped her with her self-confidence and “all positive things about how he is with women.”

Harth said that, in 2015, she was excited about her new line of men’s cosmetics and that she “needed a prominent spokesperson.”

“And after discussions with my business associate, she thought Donald Trump would be ideal. I called Trump’s executive assistant who asked me to put everything in writing by email with a formal proposal for Trump,” Harth said.

Harth noted that enough time had passed since Trump’s alleged sexual assault that she felt comfortable asking for a job that would place her in close proximity to him.

“Yes, I had moved on but had not forgotten the pain he brought into my life,” she said.

Harth filed a lawsuit in 1997 alleging that, during a January 1993 meeting at Mar-a-Lago resort, Trump pushed her against a wall, groped her and tried to get his hands beneath her dress.

During the 2016 presidential campaign, Harth restated her allegations, although she contends that she never intended to do so. According to Harth, she was foisted back into the public spotlight when reporters discovered her 1997 lawsuit.

Harth claims that hearing Trump deny her allegations caused her to turn against him. “Having to retell my experiences of Donald Trump’s harassment is the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,” she stated.

“Once the media rediscovered the complaint, Donald responded to it by repeatedly denigrating and disparaging me and releasing an old National Enquirer article from the ’90s that he planted,” she recalled.

Harth said that her efforts to get a job with Trump’s campaign or her desire to have him as a spokesman for her line of male cosmetics should not cause the public to doubt her accusations against him.

“These continued attacks on accusers and our lawyers is what makes it so hard for women to speak out, even now,” Harth said.

Despite her willingness to campaign for Trump during last year’s election, Harth now contends that he should be removed from office.

“I firmly believe Trump should resign or be investigated and impeached,” she said. “Leopards don’t change their spots.”

"BUILD THE WALL" bumper stickers now on sale. (BUY NOW)

If you would like to receive Breaking News text alerts on a smartphone or tablet, download the DML APP which is completely FREE and easy to use. Go to the Google Play Store or the IOS App Store and search for DML APP. Be sure to keep the app’s notifications setting on. Another way to receive alerts is to text to 40404 the following message: follow @realdennislynch (be sure to put a space between the word follow and the @ symbol).

To see more stories like this, sign up below for Dennis Michael Lynch’s email newsletter.







 

Comment via Facebook

 

Comment via Disqus

Send this to a friend