Trump rids of another stupid Obama policy

President Donald J. Trump has spent the past 7 months nixing former President Obama’s overreaching liberal policies.

On Wednesday, Trump continued to chip away at Obama’s legacy by lifting a ban that the former president had placed on the sale of plastic water bottles in national parks.

The ban was intended to help the environment, but it allowed the sale of plastic bottles filled with soda and juices. Bottom line, it made no sense whatsoever.

The CEO of DML NEWS, Dennis Michael Lynch said this about the ban: “This is typical Obama — thinking with his head stuck in the clouds. How silly to ban plastic water bottles, but keep plastic soda bottles. He was simply the worst, most unqualified president of our lifetime.”

Only 23 of 417 national parks implemented the policy. Most parks ignored the order because they were not willing to deprive visitors of the healthiest beverage choice available.

Some of the national parks that implemented the policy include the Grand Canyon, Zion National Park, Bryce Canyon, and Mount Rushmore.

Read the full statement from the National Park Service below:

In its commitment to providing a safe and world-class visitor experience, the National Park Service is discontinuing Policy Memorandum 11-03, commonly referred to as the “Water Bottle Ban.”

The 2011 policy, which encouraged national parks to eliminate the sale of disposable water bottles, has been rescinded to expand hydration options for recreationalists, hikers, and other visitors to national parks. The ban removed the healthiest beverage choice at a variety of parks while still allowing sales of bottled sweetened drinks. The change in policy comes after a review of the policy’s aims and impact in close consultation with Department of the Interior leadership.

“While we will continue to encourage the use of free water bottle filling stations as appropriate, ultimately it should be up to our visitors to decide how best to keep themselves and their families hydrated during a visit to a national park, particularly during hot summer visitation periods,” said Acting National Park Service Director Michael T. Reynolds.

Currently only 23 of the 417 National Park Service sites have implemented the policy. The revocation of the memorandum, which was put in place on December 14, 2011, is effective immediately. Parks will continue to promote the recycling of disposable plastic water bottles and many parks have already worked with partners to provide free potable water in bottle filling stations located at visitor centers and near trailheads.

ABOUT THE NPS

Since 1916, the National Park Service has been entrusted with the care of our national parks. With the help of volunteers and partners, we safeguard these special places and share their stories with more than 275 million visitors every year. But our work doesn’t stop there.

We are proud that tribes, local governments, nonprofit organizations, businesses, and individual citizens ask for our help in revitalizing their communities, preserving local history, celebrating local heritage, and creating close to home opportunities for kids and families to get outside, be active, and have fun.

Taking care of the national parks and helping Americans take care of their communities is a job we love, and we need—and welcome—your help and support.

Our Mission

The National Park Service preserves unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values of the National Park System for the enjoyment, education, and inspiration of this and future generations. The Park Service cooperates with partners to extend the benefits of natural and cultural resource conservation and outdoor recreation throughout this country and the world.

Explore general legislation and other laws relating to the National Park Service.

Our Employees

More than 20,000 strong, the uncommon men and women of the National Park Service share a common trait: a passion for caring for the nation’s special places and sharing their stories.

How We Are Organized

The National Park Service is a bureau of the U.S. Department of the Interior and is led by a Director nominated by the President and confirmed by the U.S. Senate. The Director is supported by senior executives who manage national programs, policy, and budget in the Washington, DC, headquarters and seven regional directors responsible for national park management and program implementation.

Our Official Emblem

The National Park Service arrowhead was authorized as our official emblem in 1951. The components of the arrowhead may have been inspired by key attributes of the National Park System, with the sequoia tree and bison representing vegetation and wildlife, the mountains and water representing scenic and recreational values, and the arrowhead itself representing historical and archeological values. A history of the arrowhead and other elements of NPS visual design is available. The arrowhead is also the registered service mark of the agency (number 4706627), protected by the trademark laws of the United States. The NPS allows limited use of the NPS arrowhead when doing so contributes to our work.

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