Trump’s voter-fraud investigation creating unexpected backlash

After President Trump’s special Election Integrity Commission requested voter information from all 50 states, hundreds of voters are now withdrawing their voter registration, according to The Hill.

The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, headed by Vice President Mike Pence and Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, sent a letter to all 50 states on June 28, requesting registered voters’ names, addresses, dates of birth, partial social security numbers, political party affiliation, voter history, felony convictions, and whether voters have registered in more than one state, as previously reported on DennisMichaelLynch.com.

It was also indicated that the voter registration information submitted by the states would be made available to the public.

Dozens of states immediately refused to comply with the commission’s request or claimed they would only provide partial information, according to what is permissible under state law.

Every state has different laws on what information in voter rolls can be made publicly available, and the rolls are typically used by campaigns or parties to compile lists of voters to target.

Colorado is one of the states that announced it would only partly comply with the Election Integrity Commission’s request, even though Colorado’s secretary of state is required under state law to provide voter roll information that is public record to anyone who requests it, despite how the information may be used by the requesting party.

Colorado Secretary of State Wayne Williams has elected to release publicly available voter information such as full name, address, political party, registration date, phone number, gender, birth year, and voting history. However, he declined to release information pertaining to Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers, full date of birth, or email addresses.

The vast majority of the other states have since indicated they are following suit and supplying only partial voter registration information.

Shortly after news spread of the commission’s probe into voter registration, Colorado reportedly experienced a significant increase in the number of voters un-registering.

In fact, one Denver clerk claimed to notice a 2,150 percent increase in voter withdrawal since July 3 compared to the previous week.

Colorado voters are allowed to withdraw their registration online or pay a fee to make their information confidential.

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