Two-headed porpoise discovered by fishermen (photos and video)

Support our flag. Get the bumper sticker. CLICK HERE

NETHERLANDS- A group of fishermen found a freaky looking two-headed porpoise. Unfortunately, the unique creature was dead.

Fearing what would happen if the kept the fish, they tossed it back into the ocean. They did manage to take a few pictures, of course.

The pictures have caught the interest of experts at the University of Rotterdam, who are trying to understand more about partial twinning in marine creatures. They have established that the porpoise died shortly after birth because its tail had not stiffened, a process that allows newborn porpoises to swim.

The experts say that there were nine cases of a conjoined twins in the cetaceans family, a group of marine life that includes whales and dolphins, before this discovery.

“The anatomy of cetaceans is strikingly different from terrestrial mammals with adaptations for living in the sea as a mammal. Much is unknown,” said Erwin Kompanje, of the Erasmus MC University Medical Center in Rotterdam. “Adding any extra case to the known nine specimens brings more knowledge on this aspect.”

Kompanje said even it’s extremely rare to find “normal twins” in cetaceans. “There is simply not enough room in the body of the female to give room to more than one fetus,” he said.

Kompanje regrets the fact that the fisherman threw the porpoise back into the ocean since they will almost certainly never find it again.

JOIN THE MOVEMENT to SAVE THE NATIONAL ANTHEM
Please join the thousands of DML readers who have purchased a bumper sticker. CLICK HERE.

If you would like to receive Breaking News text alerts on a smartphone or tablet, download the DML APP which is completely FREE and easy to use. Go to the Google Play Store or the IOS App Store and search for DML APP. Be sure to keep the app’s notifications setting on. Another way to receive alerts is to text to 40404 the following message: follow @realdennislynch (be sure to put a space between the word follow and the @ symbol).

To see more stories like this, sign up below for Dennis Michael Lynch’s email newsletter.







 

Comment via Facebook

Send this to a friend