UK Politician Gets Punched Out & Suffers Seizures

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The potential new leader for the United Kingdom Independence Party, Steven Woolfe, is recovering in the hospital after allegedly being punched by colleague Mike Hookem during an argument at a party meeting.

The incident occurred during an European Parliament meeting in Strasbourg Thursday morning.  Reportedly, the two got into an argument when Woolfe admitted that he had considered defecting to the Tories party, according to Daily Mail.  (Woolfe has been considered the favorite to become the new UKIP leader.)

Sources say Hookem told Woolfe he was “a joke” during the meeting, to which Woolfe took off his jacket and challenged Hookem to “settle this outside.”   The source said suddenly jackets were off and the two headed outside to settle the matter.

However, Hookem denies that he ever touched Woolfe, saying it was a verbal altercation only.   It was reported that Hookem punched Woolfe once, then Woolfe fell and hit his head on some bars.  He then suffered two seizures, and lost consciousness for a bit.  After hospital tests, he was found to have no bleeding on the brain, nor any clots, and is expected to fully recover.

Hookem is a regular blogger for Breitbart, and had reported in August 2015 that while making a documentary on the refugee crisis in Calais, France, someone had pulled a gun on him.   He had also reportedly taken credit for stopping 25 immigrants from coming into the United Kingdom.

 

Steven Woolfe talks about potentially becoming a leader of the party:

 

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