United Nations Attempts To Step Into U.S. Race Relations Issues

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An international human rights affiliate group, the United Nations’ Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent, now has the United States on its radar.

The conclusion of a recent report by the U.N. group on the history of slavery in the United States claims that African Americans are owed reparations for a “history of racial terrorism” in the U.S. 

This group of “experts” includes human rights lawyers from around the world, presented their report on the United States to the United Nations Human Rights Council on Monday, claiming there is a continuous link between the current racial tensions and the “dark chapters of American history” of slavery.

In their report, the Working Group says that three members of their delegation visited the United States from January 19-29, 2016, at the invitation of the Government of the United States of America.    The report doesn’t state exactly which government official invited them, but they came to investigate the racial situation in the U.S.

Coincidentally, there just happened to be massive Black Lives Matter protests and riots taking place in the United States during that exact time period, blocking bridges and freeways across the country, from San Francisco to Minneapolis to San Antonio and many other cities.

The U.N. group’s report said, “The dangerous ideology of white supremacy inhibits social cohesion amongst the US population.”  They said that African Americans are disproportionately incarcerated.

“Despite substantial changes since the end of the enforcement of Jim Crow and the fight for civil rights, ideology ensuring the domination of one group over another, continues to negatively impact the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of African Americans today,” it said.

Referencing the recent uprisings over police officers “killing unarmed African American men,” the panel warned against “impunity for state violence,” which has created, in its words, a “human rights crisis” that “must be addressed as a matter of urgency.”

“In particular, the legacy of colonial history, enslavement, racial subordination and segregation, racial terrorism and racial inequality in the United States remains a serious challenge, as there has been no real commitment to reparations and to truth and reconciliation for people of African descent,” the report stated. “Contemporary police killings and the trauma that they create are reminiscent of the past racial terror of lynching.”

“Despite substantial changes since the end of the enforcement of Jim Crow and the fight for civil rights, ideology ensuring the domination of one group over another, continues to negatively impact the civil, political, economic, social and cultural rights of African Americans today,” it said in the report. “The dangerous ideology of white supremacy inhibits social cohesion amongst the US population.”

The United Nations working group “recommended” reparations to African Americans in the form of “a formal apology, health initiatives, educational opportunities … psychological rehabilitation, technology transfer and financial support, and debt cancellation.”

The three members of the delegation were Mireille Fanon Mendes-France, Sabelo Gumedze and Ricardo Sunga III.

They met with representatives of several government departments, including the State Department, Homeland Security, HUD, Health and Human Services, the Labor Department, the Justice Department, the EPA and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

They met with federal judges in Baltimore, the Mayor’s office in Jackson, Mississippi and the Attorney General of Mississippi.

They went to Chicago and met with the Illinois Attorney General, the Chicago Mayor’s office and the Chicago police department.

In New York City, they met with the NY Attorney General.

In Washington, DC, they met with “officials of the White House working on African American issues” and with staff of the congressional black caucus.

The group noted regret that it wasn’t given access to the Mississippi State Penitentiary as requested, nor was it allowed to meet with “all of the high-level state and local authorities” that it had requested.







 

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