Virginia Governor Gives 200,000 Ex-Cons Right to Vote

Virginia gov 1

“It was morally the right thing to do,” he claimed.   Take a look at the excuse he used to push this through – he played the race card.

In an interview with radio host John Catsimatidis Sunday, Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe defended his recent executive order that has allowed more than 200,000 convicted felons the right to register to vote, saying “They’re back in the community. They’ve served their debts to society. Why do we want people to continue to be second-class citizens?”

McAuliffe used his executive power to sign the order April 22, claiming he was correcting an old law whose “harsh sentencing policies” have disproportionately hurt African Americans.   The Virginia law barred felons from voting for life.

“There’s no question we’ve had a horrible history in voting rights as relates to Africian-Americans – we should remedy it,” McAuliffe said in an interview in April.

Reportedly, the order has no exceptions, even for those convicted of violent crimes, including murder and rape.  It’s a complete restoration of rights.  All ex-cons are free to register to vote – how many of them actually will, remains to be seen.   “My message is going to be that I have now done my part,” McAuliffe said.

Some Republican Virginia lawmakers have announced they will be taking legal action against McAuliffe for signing the order.   “The singular purpose of Terry McAuliffe’s governorship is to elect Hillary Clinton president of the United States. This office has always been a stepping stone to a job in Hillary Clinton’s Cabinet,” said Virginia House of Delegates Speaker William Howell.

McAuliffe was co-chair of Bill Clinton’s reelection campaign in 1996, and was chairman of Hillary Clinton’s 2008 presidential campaign.

Here is Sunday’s radio interview with McAuliffee:







 

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