Washington Post article could vindicate Trump in Russian prostitute accusation

A Breitbart report reveals that the Washington Post may be an unlikely source of corroboration for President Trump when it comes to disproving the already laughable claim that while Trump was staying in the presidential suite at the Ritz Carlton Hotel in Moscow in 2013, he hired “a number of prostitutes to perform a ‘golden showers’ (urination) show in front of him.”

This outrageous accusation was made in a 35-page dossier authored by former intelligence agent Christopher Steele, which was commissioned by Democrats and anti-Trump Republicans who wanted to get dirt on President Trump.

Steele recently admitted in court documents that part of his work still needed to be verified.

In an article published on Tuesday, titled, “Unlikely middlemen: Trump Jr. emails point to father-son duo,” the Washington Post reported that while he was in Russia, Trump spent time with Aras Agalarov, a Russian billionaire real estate tycoon, and Argalorov’s son, singer Emin. Both had attended the Miss Universe contest and were acquaintances of Trump, and Trump was reportedly discussing the possibility of building a tower in Moscow with the father.

Deep within that article, the Post quoted “a person with knowledge” of Trump’s 2013 trip saying that Trump’s bodyguard rejected an offer from Emin Agalarov to send prostitutes to Trump’s hotel room.

The Washington Post reported:

“A person with knowledge of the 2013 trip to Moscow said Emin Agalarov offered to send prostitutes to Trump’s hotel room, but the repeated offers were rejected by Keith Schiller, Trump’s longtime bodyguard. The person with knowledge of the trip insisted on anonymity because they were not authorized by Trump to publicly discuss the matter.”

Breitbart points out that “this would have been the same hotel where the dossier claims Trump engaged in a ‘golden shower’ escapade with Russian prostitutes.”

This same dossier claimed that Trump lawyer Michael Cohen held “secret meetings” with Kremlin officials in Prague in August 2016. It was easily discredited by Cohen, who proved he never even traveled to Prague. 

Citing current and former government officials, the New Yorker reported that intelligence community members called the dossier a “nutty” piece of evidence to submit to a U.S. president.

In April, CNN reported that the dossier served as part of the FBI’s justification for seeking the FISA court’s reported approval to clandestinely monitor the communications of Carter Page, the American oil industry consultant who was tangentially and briefly associated with Trump’s presidential campaign.

In testimony last month to the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Comey admitted he pushed back against a request from Trump to possibly investigate the origins of “salacious material” that the agency possessed in the course of its investigation into alleged Russian interference. He also refused to answer questions about his agency’s ties to the dossier.

Author and journalist Paul Sperry reported in the New York Post last week that, this month, the Senate Judiciary Committee threatened to subpoena Fusion GPS, the company that hired Steele to produce the dossier, since they won’t say who financed it.

Fusion GPS has ties to Clinton allies, having been hired to dig up dirt on GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney and pro-life activists protesting the Planned Parenthood.

In September 2016, Fusion GPS co-founder and partner Peter R. Fritsch contributed at least $1,000 to the Hillary Victory Fund and the Hillary For America campaign, Federal Election Commission data show. His wife also donated money to Hillary’s campaign.

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