World leaders pose in photo mocking Trump

A photo taken on Monday showing five Nordic prime ministers all holding onto a soccer ball is being widely compared to the photo taken roughly two weeks ago of President Trump and Middle Eastern officials huddled around a glowing orb of the world.

Leaders of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden are seen as supposedly mocking President Trump, Saudi King Salman and Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi for holding the illuminated globe at the Global Centre for Combating Extremist Ideology in Riyadh during its opening on May 21.

When it was published, the Twitterverse went nuts over the strange-looking image, saying that it resembled a comic book version of evil villains plotting to take over the world. Now it looks as though the Nords may have one-upped them.

Not so, said Norwegian government official Sigbjoern Aanes. According to Aanes, the photo was taken at a meeting of regional government heads in Norway “to promote UN sustainability goals, which were written on the soccer ball.”

He noted that Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg didn’t realize until later that the photo could be misconstrued as a though the prime ministers were mocking Trump and the Middle Easter leaders.

However, once she realized the resemblance, Solberg ran with the notion and posted a montage of the two images on her Facebook page with a snarky comment: “Who rules the world? Riyadh vs Bergen. Don’t know what they’re on the top photo was thinking. On the bottom photo is the five Nordic Statsministerne that holds a ball with bærekraftsmålene. We hope they’ll be a road map for the future.”

 

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